12.

H2O is a 12 minute film from 1929 by Ralph Steiner.  This film was all about aqua! i was once in a film made by a grad student which used the water in a simular way.  This form of liquid perception really gives a cool element to films.  I’m not too hot on it being the entire film though.  

Moods of the Sea is a 9 minute film from 1942 by John Hoffman and Vorkapich Slavko.  This film really emcompasses what its like to be around the sea! I really liked the shots of the birds and large waves as they crashed with the music!   

The reflecting pool is a 7 minute film by Bill Viola.  This film was made with a really cool concept of water reflection.  The various shots of people both on the water and out were very interesting to see.  the sound of the water was very calming as well.  i’m glad he didn’t use any music but more of a sound scape.  

Waving is a film from 1987 by Ann Marie Flemming.  This is one of the more personal projects i’ve seen.  I enjoyed this a lot because we don’t often get direct narratives from the film maker.  The added video of the girl drowning really pushed how deeply she felt about her grandmother and the pain she is encountering.  

Lost avenues is a 6 minute film from 1991.  This reminded me of the found footage works we saw earlier in the semester.  i really didn’t see any congruency in the various shots but it was interesting none the less.  I like the colors used and bloches on the screen.  

Comingled Containers is a 3 minute film from 1996 by Stan Breakhage.  Breakhage has become one of my favorite directors to watch.  Each time his work is clear and very interesting.  In this film my i really liked the light images.  his shots of water where cool too, throughout this exploration of liquid perception i really noticed how many differnt shades of blue people can pull out of water.  

Light is calling is an 8 minute film from 2004 by Bill Morrison.  This may have became one of my new favorites.  i really liked the appearing and dis appearing images in the brown screen.  I wonder how he did this and how long it took him.  I specifically liked the quick shots of animals. 

Infinity Kisses is a 9 minute film from 2008 by Carolee  Schneemann.  This film made me laugh so hard.  Its just a bunch of pictures of a lady kissing her cat.  I almost feel like tanya played a joke on the class in the end like after all we’ve seen we end with this! haha but still its been a fun ride with avant garde and i’m so excited to continue my exploration.  

 

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One Response to 12.

  1. Jess says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading your blog for this semester and am glad you moved all your posts here, as it is much easier to comment. First a bit of gentle criticism. I know this was not an English writing class, but hopefully my suggestions will help in the future — and I do not have the best grammar or spelling either. Maybe in the future you will want to pay a little more attention to capitalizations and spelling, especially of people’s names (Brakhage, Su Friedrich, Breer, Maya Deren — just a few that stuck out). You would also have fuller posts if you wrote more about why you liked the film, what was so unique about one over another, and/or why was something interesting. I know these are “just” blog posts, but they are for an academic course. I am also not saying you did all of this all of the time, but I did pick up on it. With that said, I was really interested in what you had to say, especially when I knew you did not have a lot of experience with films of this nature. I could tell as I read from the beginning to the last post that you really grew as a viewer. You even started to make references to other films — No-Face from Hayao Miyazaki’s “Spirited Away” (2001), comments on how Ruttmann’s “Weekend” (1930) inspired you as a musician and even a social comment regarding Anger’s Fireworks (1947): “I feel as though he has a form of repressed anger against America and feels as though they turned their back on him”. I hope you do continue exploring avant-garde cinema. Gook luck on all future endevours!

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